This may be an obvious statement, but it’s important to track calories for weight-loss. Even if you think you’ve been eating “healthy,” you could still be taking in too many calories, leading to a stalled weight loss or even weight gain. “Often times, we are eating too much,” White says. “Dropping calories can cause a deficit and lead to weight loss.”
Before you go on you should have a simple understanding of the process your body goes through when dropping the pounds. Fat (along with protein and carbohydrates) is stored energy, plain and simple. Calories are the unit that is used to measure the potential energy in said fats, carbs, and proteins. Your body will convert fat to usable energy through a series of chemical processes, and any excess energy (calories) that you don’t need will be stored away. To lose weight, you must expend more energy (or calories) than you take in. When you are using more than you taking in, your body draws on stored fat to convert it to energy, which makes the fat cells shrink. It doesn’t disappear; it simply changes form, like water to steam. While this is the basic process, you also have to take into account genetic and environmental factors. How well the above process takes place does vary from person to person.
Based on my experience in nutrition counseling, most of us tend to snack on foods that aren’t nutrient-dense, but are high in calories. For example, skipping sugary beverages is often the easiest way to lose weight faster. You don’t feel full from drinks — even the ones that do contain calories — so swapping those out for sparkling water or unsweetened tea and coffee is the best place to start. Other major culprits often come in refined grains like cereals, chips, crackers, and cookies.

Should you find yourself at an unhealthy weight, weight loss can be important. But, in general, it’s both your physical and mental health which should be your focus, and that should always take priority over any pressure you may feel to slim down from an already healthy weight. Nevertheless, if you are thinking about kickstarting your own weight loss journey, there is one change you can make at mealtimes in a bid to aid your results. And, this doesn't even affect the type of food that you eat.
Sure, you certainly need to drink plenty of water to help combat bloating, you can (and should!) also consume high-water content foods. Reach for cucumbers, tomatoes, watermelon, asparagus, grapes, celery, artichokes, pineapple, and cranberries — all of which contain diuretic properties that will also help you stay full due to their higher fiber content.
It can actually help you cut back on calories. That's because capsaicin, a compound found in jalapeño and cayenne peppers, may (slightly) increase your body's release of stress hormones such as adrenaline, which can speed up your ability to burn calories. What's more, eating hot peppers may help slow you down. You're less likely to wolfed down that plate of spicy spaghetti — and therefore stay more mindful of when you're full. Some great adds besides hot peppers: ginger and turmeric.

Socializing is very important. But it gets a bit tricky when you want to lose weight and also want to hang out with your friends or have to attend an office party. In this scenario, stick to a glass of wine, sip slow, keep moving around and chatting with different people, and snack on protein-rich foods. Make sure to drink water to prevent dehydration.
Place the pot on the stove, put in the rose petals, and add just enough distilled water to completely cover them. If some float to the top it’s not a big deal. Cover the pot with a tightly fitting lid and simmer until the petals lose most of their color, about 15-20 minutes. Strain the liquid into a glass jar and keep in the refrigerator for up to 6 days. Drink about ½-1 cup every morning on an empty stomach.
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